Recovering Litigation Costs in Illinois State Court – What About Westlaw Research?

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In a small dollar case, a plaintiff’s recoverable “costs” typically include filing fees and service fees. See Household Int’l v. Liberty Mutual, 195 Ill. 2d 578 (2001).  This amount is usually negligible (usually less than $500) and not worth fighting over. However, where a fee-shifting provision in a contract provides for prevailing party “litigation expenses” or “costs of collection” (as many commercial contracts do) and the case drags on one or more years, the litigation costs can be substantial.

In Illinois, “[c]osts are allowances in the nature of incidental damages awarded by law to reimburse the prevailing party, to some extent at least, for the expenses necessarily incurred in the assertion of his rights in court.” Galowich v. Beech Aircraft Corp., 92 Ill. 2d 157, 165-66 (1982).

Code sections 5-108 and 5-109 – allow the a winning party to recover costs. The First District, in  analyzing a Federal Truth in Lending claim, held that any expenses paid to a third party including expert witness expenses, special process server expenses, deposition expenses, filing and messenger fees and computerized legal research costs can all be recovered by the prevailing plaintiff. Johnson v. Thomas, 342 Ill.App.3d 382, 401-402 (1st Dist. 2003).

By contrast, “overhead expenses” – costs a lawyer incurs independent of a specific case – are generally not recoverable.  Overhead costs include: telephone charges, in-house delivery charges, in-house photocopying, check processing, newspaper subscriptions, and in-house paralegal and secretarial assistance. Id. at 401-402.

The reason: overhead costs, at least in theory, are already reflected in an attorney’s hourly rate. See Harris Trust & Savings Bank, 230 Ill. App. 3d 591, 599 (1st Dist. 1992).

Whether a prevailing party can recover for computerized legal research expenses will turn on the winning side’s billing method.  Where the attorney’s fee is contingent or fixed – computer research expenses are not allowed.  The theory being that the computer research benefitted the contingent fee lawyer by reducing his research time and increasing his efficiency.  Because of this, the contingent lawyer should not be able to shift the computer research costs to a losing party. 

In contrast, for an attorney charging by the hour, the saved time resulting from computer research actually works against him – he will bill for fewer hours than if he researched the “old fashioned way” (does anyone remember Shepardizing?). 

With hourly billing, “the attorney should not be required to absorb the additional expense engendered by computer research fees in light of the diminished billable hours that result from such computer assistance”. Id.

Johnson does caution that computer research expenses are properly denominated “fees”; not costs. This is because computer research is part of the attorney’s overall effort in prosecuting or defending his client’s case. Id. So, if the statute or contract allows for recovery of fees and costs, computerized research expenses will be recoverable.  Conversely, if the contract only provides for winning party “costs”, computer research charges can’t be recovered under Johnson‘s rationale.

The take-away: I’ve been involved in more than a few multi-year cases where the litigation expenses (aside from the attorneys’ fees) exceeded $10,000.  As a consequence, a working knowledge of what litigation expenses an Illinois court will and will not permit is essential for practitioners engaged in protracted commercial litigation.  

 

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PaulP

Litigation attorney at Fisher Kanaris, P.C. representing businesses and individuals in all types of commercial disputes.

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